Discrimination in the Consitution

Tradition is not an excuse. It just ends up seeming that way.

Honestly I don't see why there isn't more attention paid to the fact that many fully fledged U.S. citizens and voters cannot run for certain public offices. There are extra limitations on everything from being President of the United States to being a representative in the House of the Alaska Legislature. Here's the deal, plain and simple:

If you can vote, you should be able to run.

Obviously ageism isn't something that people think about often, but just because a person may eventually be old enough to say become president doesn't mean that it's not wrong to deny them that chance right now.

From the Constitution of the United States of America:

Article I, Section 2: No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen.

Article I, Section 3: No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen.

Article II, Section 1: No person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty-five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States.

Regardless of the reasoning behind the original creation of these clauses, they certainly have no place in the United States of today's (pseudo) democracy. Inhabiting the state from which you are a senator or representative is clearly appropriate, just as being a citizen of the United States would be in order to be president, but the requirement that you be a natural-born citizen is going to far, as of course are the age requirements.

Why can't we just get things straight on the whole being-an-adult thing? Unless the nation wishes to make 21 the age of adulthood, (which might not be bad, were it not for the fact that there would be national outrage), the age at which one can run for any public office, the drinking age and a myriad of other age limits should all be set at 18. Clearly there is an argument that the human brain is not fully developed until about 25, but even at that old age, senatorship and the presidency are still inexplicably out of reach.

It's not like it would be a great idea to elect an 18 year old president. It's not like it would ever happen, either. This is entirely about principle, and principle states that an adult citizen of the United States should be able to run for any public office. If you can make votes you should be able to receive them. Outdated eccentricities of the Constitution just need to go. Other injustices such as those against blacks and women have been corrected, but the plight of the young remains. You may not think it's a big deal, but I believe it's worth changing our founding document to remedy its ageism, even if it means disturbing tradition.

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