Remotitude

In this world, there exists a place so worthless it was bought for two cents an acre - and there was still a vast amount of popular opposition to the purchase.

It is a place so inconvenient that no map wishes to deal with it. If the established cartographic powers deign to show it at all it is shrunk and relocated so as to better indicate its irrelevance.

The majority of this place consists of a centered landmass known for certain generally applicable stereotypes of temperature, topography, wildlife and lifestyles. A portion of the entity, however, consists of a strip of coastline connected to a foreign country not worth mentioning by name. Within the larger forgotten area, this heterogenous region is even more discounted.

This discounted strip of land, in turn, is bordered by a large group of forested and largely uninhabited islands. One of these, relegated to the end of the group, is a mere comma at the end of the sentence of isles.

On this comma of an island there lies a town. Compared to the size of the island this town is incredibly small - streets and buildings clinging to cliffsides on the very edge of a single side of the many-faceted island, one of many in a forgotten region of a forgotten place in the farthest corner of the globe...
That is Ketchikan, Alaska.

Comments

  1. alaskamama15 March, 2009

    We really do need to get map makers to put Alaska in the right place. Alaska really isn't between the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, south of California. How must the Mexicans feel when Alaska is put where their country is? And while we're correcting the maps, let's make Alaska it's real size (Sorry, Texans, but Alaska really is a lot bigger than Texas!)

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