Finally, a Finished Thesis

It's been over a month since I posted to this blog, and without a doubt the blame lies squarely with my senior honors thesis, which I finished just six days ago. Back on April 1st I said I was done with it, but now I'm telling the truth. Lingít ḵa Waashdan Ḵwáan, the Tlingit and the Americans: Interactions and Transformations, 1856-1896 is officially done as a Georgetown University senior honors thesis in history.

Over the course of nine months, I spent countless hours on this work, (referenced here, here, and here), and now feel more interested in my topic than ever. The 19th-century history of the Tlingit people is truly under-researched and under-studied, and every Alaskan should learn more about it, given the insights it provides into the nature of their state's creation.

In any case, the thesis ended up being 170 double-spaced pages long, with title page, notes, images, glossaries and bibliography included. (Just counting the main text it's 137.) The work is now available for download online from the Georgetown Institutional Repository. Here's the link: http://hdl.handle.net/10822/557915.

If you happen to take a look at the work, please tell me any comments, critiques, or corrections you have. I expect I will be going back to this thesis in the coming years, expanding on it, improving it, and working to advance my own knowledge while joining with anyone else who wants to share in the endeavor.


This is the last map I created for the thesis. It shows the communities of Lingít Aaní (Tlingit Country) with over 100 residents, (total population listed), according to the 1890 U.S. Census. Communities are colored according to the group that constituted the majority of the population. 

The names given by the Census for the places here marked with Tlingit and Haida names are as follows: Klakwan (Tlákw.aan), Chilkoot Mission (Lḵoot), Hindostukee (Yandesit’aḵyé), Huna (Xunaa), Hoochinoo (Aangóon), Sitka (Sheet’ká), Wrangell (Ḵaachx̱an.áakw), Loring (Kax̱.àan), Bourroughs Bay (Joonák), Klawak (Lawáak), and Howkan (Gáwk’yaan).

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